Basic settings for SQL Server 2012/2014, part 3

Part 3: simplifying the life of the DBA When I’ve got the environment set up quite the way I like it, I usually set up a repository where I keep all my scripts. I designate one server as the “master” for my purposes, and set up a database called DBADB. In hereĀ I put all my standard scripts (like the bunch from Brent Ozar & co., SP_WHOISACTIVE from Adam Machanic, the log table for Ola Hallengren’s maintenance solution and such) to keep track of them, and to have only one place to update. In my standard setup scripts for new databases, I also create a local DBADB as well as a local user for replication.

Double Whammy

So there I was, gearing up for a trip to a customer 90 minutes away and my audiobook had just finished. Having listened to Matan Yungman at SQL Pass in Copenhagen, I vaguely remembered him saying something about SQL Server Radio, so I decied to check it out. Turns out they’ve been doing it for a while, and the show length (around 60 minutes) suits me just fine. Matan Yungman and Guy Glantser both work for Madeira SQL Serverices, and are well known speakers in the SQL Server Community. The only problems I’ve found are that they’ve only done 19 shows so far (and I spend A LOT of time in my car :P ) and that they have some issues with sound and mixing levels.

Dude, where's my disk?

Today I took a look at a clients 10g Oracle RAC environment where one node apparently had started misbehaving quite some time ago. The scenario was that both nodes were up, cluster ready services was up, nodeapps were up, ASM was up but the instance was down. Starting from the top with the database alert log, it was apparent that ASM had no available disk groups for this database. Okay, let’s ask ASM what it feels, then. Looking in the ASM log file it was equally obvious that the ASM instance was online but didn’t service any disk groups. That’s odd.