Logitech Spotlight - initial thoughts

As you know by now, I do a fair bit of presenting and teaching. One of my primary tools is Powerpoint, and that necessitates a presentation clicker. I’ve been using a Logitech R400 for quite some time, and it does its job admirably. A few weeks ago, a colleague of mine showed me the new Logitech Spotlight presentation remote which boasts quite a few new functions (as well as a hefty price tag). We ordered one each a few days ago, and a couple of hours ago I got mine. Here are my initial findings. The box itself is very nice and thankfully simple to open.

"File is read only" when trying to change TCP settings in SQL Server Configuration Manager

Today I hit upon this bug that’s apparently been around for ages. In short, sometimes SQL Server Configuration Manager works as expected when it comes to enabling and disabling specific IP addresses for the instance to listen on, and sometimes you are greeted with a very irritating message telling you that “the specified file is read only”. Not very helpful, unfortunately. Digging deeper into this, there is a fairly simple way to get around the issue, provided one is not afraid of dipping into the registry. All of the settings in the configuration manager are stored in the registry and can be edited there without the pesky error message.

Combining tables in Power BI and finding two(?) bugs

A student of mine had a question about combining data from multiple Excel sheets and doing calculations on the data. I realized I didn’t have a clear-cut answer so I decided to do some digging. The scenario looked like this: I created three excel files, each with a column for name and one for value. The idea is to simulate sales persons, sales amounts and having one file per product. I called the first file ProductA, the second ProductB and the third ProductC.    Then it was time to combine the tables. I wanted the result to be a table of all the data for the other tables, but it should also include where the data came from - i.

The last post of the year

On January the 7th I celebrate my 10th anniversary at Atea. I came to be a consultant after 6 years working internal IT at the local university, and let’s just say consulting was a bit of a… change in pace. At the university I was responsible for everything that was spelled Oracle or SQL Server (and quite a lot of server/SAN/Windows and UNIX/Linux stuff as well), handling everything from day-to-day with backups, performance tuning and troubleshooting, to architecture, design and implementation of new systems and solutions. Anyone who’s ever spent some time at a university can attest to the place being somewhat of a “gated community” when it comes to how things work, and while I had a lot of responsibility, in many respects way more than I ever could have had out in the industry at that level of proficiency, it was still the university.

T-SQL Tuesday - body language

This is my contribution to this month’s T-SQL Tuesday, this time hosted by Andy Yun. I was sitting calmly in a session at PASS Summit 2016 listening with only one ear. I was using only one ear as I was busy contemplating the many ways the speaker’s presentation skills could be improved. Teaching and presentation skills go hand in hand, but there are several examples of speakers having one but not the other - the result is predictably somewhat lacking. The more events I attend I can conclude that presenters generally know their technical content VERY well (most often to a downright scary degree) but many can improve on both their presentation design and their presentation skills.

PASS Summit and the #SQLFamily

PASS Summit 2016 was a week ago, and I’ve tried (unsuccessfully) to put my thoughts into words. I’ve read many excellent blog posts about the conference and I wholly agree with them all, but I wanted to articulate my feelings in a blog post of my own. PASS Summit 2016 was my third Summit on paper, but was more like my first in reality. The previous two times, I went to the sessions, spent time on the exhibition floor, ate my lunch with other attendees and then I went back to my hotel to read up, do research, work or just watch TV.

Reducing SSIS anxiety

Story time again. This tuesday I was to create a set of import packages in SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS) to automate data loading from a couple of my customers' storage systems. Said data comes in the shape of several text files - some delimited, some fixed length, all of varying size and shape. Anyone who’s worked with SSIS know how “fun” it is to click-click-click your way through the incomprehensibly boring GUI - a GUI that does NOT lend itself to any efficient work at all. We had been struggling with this for a couple of days before summer already, but the data format has changed and it’s basically the same amount of work to just redo the whole thing again from scratch than to try to edit all the tiny details in all the gazillion boxes everywhere.

Thoughts on communities

I’ve just stepped on the train from Gothenburg and SQL Saturday #536, where I had the honor of giving a talk about consolidation with SQL Server 2016. This SQL Saturday was organized by Mikael Wedham, a very friendly and exceedingly knowledgeable Swede. He had managed quite an amazing lineup with speakers this year: John Q. Martin, Erland Sommarskog, Mark Broadbent and Cathrine Wilhelmsen just to mention a few. As events go, this one was a small-to-mid-sized event. I think I heard Mikael say that about 90 were registered and about 15-20 were no-shows. I’m sorry to see so many no-shows, especially as this is an all-volunteer event all around, but then I was very happy to see everybody else that DID show up and make the event spectacular.